Dublin, Ireland

Toronto, Canada

Cancun, Mexico

GLOBAL PROJECT EVALUATION OF SOCIAL DISTRICTS VIBRANCY AND SAFETY

BUILDING AN ALLIANCE FOR COMPLIANCE AND CIVILITY

Nighttime Economy Management is an evolving specialization in cities throughout the world, dominated by addressing impacts of residential development near nightlife districts, increased awareness of security and safety, especially from sexual assault and gun violence, quality of life impacts from sound, trash and bio-waste, and desire to preserve the social spaces for people to gather and enjoy in person connections with food, drink, music and dance.

The GLOBAL PROJECT is a demonstration of how to measure key indicators associated with risk to public safety and quality of life in nightlife "social districts". Three cities are participating in the project: Toronto, Canada, Dublin, Ireland and Cancun Mexico.

PROJECT OBJECTIVE: The goal is to establish alliances to collaborate on sharing data and developing a strategic approach to enhance vibrancy, assure safety and plan for people.

Through programs and alliances implemented through the Hospitality Zone Assessment process, a comparison of the following variables will document progress from systems changes in nighttime management.

  • MARKET FORCES: Demands that are driven by demographics, life stage, life styles, development and public health and welfare
  • THE PATRON: Those living or visiting a city who are seeking unique “social experiences”
  • THE SOCIAL VENUE: Business responds to market forces for products and services, while maintaining compliance with government and community standards
  • THE SOCIAL DISTRICT: An area that evolves as a social destination based upon options, convenience, safety and management of risk
  • GOVERNMENT: City planning, economic development, zoning and regulations shape the mixed of uses and provide tools to support patron responsibility campaigns, licensing processes and education resources for venues, and coordinated compliance monitoring for early assistance and enforcement

DUBLIN STUDY AREAS

TORONTO STUDY AREAS

EVALUATION MODEL

TERMINOLOGY

  • Social Venue: A general term to apply to all venues that provide food, drink (alcohol and non-alcohol), music, dance, entertainment as part of social interaction. This could include cafes, restaurants, bars, taverns, pubs, night clubs, cinema, billiards, etc.
  • Social District: An area with a concentration (walking distance) of social venues, often in a mixed use (with residential) area.
  • Storefront Uses: This information will define what percentage of storefronts (retail, professional, services, social venues) are in the district. For Social Venues, this will be defined further by hours, entertainment (live or DJ), seating occupancy, alcohol and/or food service, outdoor seating (sidewalk, patio (other than sidewalk), rooftop), etc.
  • Infrastructure: This would be a visual assessment of the sidewalk, lighting, area outside venues, parking areas, area for pick-up and drop-off of passengers, etc.
  • Social Occupancy: This would be an analysis of seating capacity of Social Venues, with an analsysis of mix, and combined seating for all venues.
  • Market Forces: Summary of external factors driving demand for nighttime social activities.
  • Alliances: How are the different stakeholder sectors organized and work together in the designated area.
  • Venue: Evaluation of business mix, with number of social venues, those providing food, alcohol, live and DJ music, other entertainment, hours, etc. Also, types of policy, training and practices consistent with business plan, regulations and community standards
  • Compliance: Aggregate of inspection and calls for service information for Social Venues in a designated area highlighting those in compliance over the study period.
  • Safety: Police reports and community organization data on crimes specific to the social activity in the study area that may be directly or indirectly associated with alcohol and venues.

DATA POINTS FOR COMPARISON: 2018 VERSUS 2019

A general impression of venues in social districts is that a few "bad operators" create the most risk and disorder in the community.

The goal is to engage key stakeholders to identify variables to measure risk and compliance to rules, regulations and community standards, provide tools to increase compliance and civility, and coordinate early assistance and recognition of best practices to reduce risk.

CRIME, HARM AND DISORDER

Crime reports in the study area can indicate patterns of risk, and opportunity for collaborative social media and marketing to inform venues and their patrons. Reports specific to alcohol related incidents or crime can also provide data on place of last drink, an important tool to provide information to venues, propose improvements in alcohol service practices or strategies for assisting at-risk patrons.

POTENTIAL INDICATORS TO BE IDENTIFIED

Rank the top risks to venue patrons and the public?

  • Aggravated Robbery
  • Aggressive Driving
  • Aggessive Panhandling
  • Assaults causing harm
  • Assault Minor
  • Assault or obstruction of police/official, resisting arrest
  • Curfew Violation
  • Disorder
  • Emergency Room Transport
  • Impaired Driving
  •     Arrest
  •     Crash with Injury
  •     Crash with Fatality
  • Impaired Pedestrians: Injuries, Fatalities
  •     Arrest
  •     Injury
  •     Fatality
  • Intimidation Stalking
  • Intoxicated Person/Drunkenness offence
  • Mugging/Purse/Phone Snatching
  • Pedestrian Violation
  • Possession of drugs for sale or supply
  • Possession of drugs for personal use
  • Possession of offensive weapons (not firearms)
  • Possession of Drugs
  • Public order offences
  • Robbery of an establishment or institution
  • Reckless Driving
  • Robbery from the person
  • Theft from person
  • Theft from shop
  • Sexual Assault
  • Underage Alcohol Purchase/Attempt
  • Underage Alcohol Possession
  • Vehicle Break-in and Theft
  • Vandalism - Criminal damage (not arson)

 

VENUE COMPLIANCE

The goal is to establish baseline information about the overall level of compliance by all social venues in the study area.

The basic strategy is to use information of the most common mistakes or violations made by new and existing venues, share with a network of venue leaders, and collaborate on any outreach, education or training, either by the agency or by the association/alliance of venues to improve compliance.

POTENTIAL INDICATORS TO BE IDENTIFIED

Rank the most common violations of new and existing venues?

ALCOHOL SERVICE

  • Sale to Underage Person
  • Underage in Possession
  • Service to Intoxicated Person
  • False Identification
  • Place of Last Drink
  • Server Training Requirement
  •  IDENTIFY ADDITIONAL FACTORS

FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

  • Occupancy Management (maintaining legal)
  • Exits - Signage
  • Exits - Blockage
  • Emergency Equipment
  • Evacuation Plan
  •  IDENTIFY ADDITIONAL FACTORS

LICENSING AND INSPECTIONS

  • Sound Management
  • Outdoor Seating
  • Trash Management
  •  IDENTIFY ADDITIONAL FACTORS

EXAMPLES OF RISK FACTORS

  • Venue Management
  • Fights or Aggressive Behavior
  • Patron Theft of Property (e.g. Smart Phone)
  • Crowd Management – Occupancy Violation
  • Sound Management – Disturbances to Residents
  • Place of Last Drink Reports
  • Name of Venue – Frequency of Citations
  • Blood Alcohol Level – Number of Drinks Consumed
  • Training and Policies
  • Untrained Service Staff
  • Untrained Security Staff
  • Lack of House Policy on Safety and Security
  • Unlicensed Venues e.g. Party Buses
  • Alcohol Service without License
  • Underage Possession/Consumption
  • Parking lot – Alcohol Consumption

VENUE ASSESSMENT: SELF-COMPLIANCE POLICIES AND PRACTICES

Building an alliance of venues in the study area, either through a formal association or ad hoc group will provide more efficient means of communication and data collection.

As the areas of non-compliance are identified, this alliance can work as mentors to assist at-risk businesses access better policy, practices and training.

The goal is to establish a baseline of information about the current status of participation by venues or their staff in any existing training resources that are available.

Over the course of the year, a survey and street level inventory and a formal alliance of venues in the study area will work to increase participation and showcase progress.

REDUCING RISK

  • Responsible Alcohol Beverage Service
  • Food Safety
  • Fire Safety
  • Active Shooter and Terrorism
  • Accessibility Standard
  • Workplace Violence & Harassment Policies
  • Incident Investigation
  • Workplace Hazards
  • Slip, Trip and Fall Prevention
  • Community and Business Associations

Diffusion of innovations as a theory for Social District Management

Diffusion of innovations is a theory that seeks to explain how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread through cultures.

Moving from a Patron and Venue focus of risk management to a District focus of Compliance versus Enforcement requires a new technology built upon shared data and alliances among government agencies and venues operating in a social district.

A PROPOSED outcome of the Global City Project is to evaluate risk management in the two study areas; establish a baseline of venue policy and practices, including dedicated training of staff; and collaborate to achieve the following progress  from 2018 to 2019.

  • PATRON | Measure include
  • Reduction in crime related to alcohol (i.e. underage access, impaired driving, aggression and assault)
  • Reduction in crime related to property (i.e. vandalism, theft, robbery)
  • VENUE | Measures include:
  • Increase in the number of venues in compliance
  • Increase participation in training programs and forums
  • DISTRICT | Measures include:
  • Formal alliance of majority of venue operators in study areas as advocates and mentors for self-compliance
  • Improved diversity of social options, including live entertainment and performances and mix of day, evening and late-night storefront uses
  • Improved collaboration among venues and agencies in risk management

 

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