ASSURE SAFETY: PANELS, SOLUTION SESSIONS AND WORKSHOPS

NIGHTLIFE SETTINGS are high-intensity environments with complex dynamics and risk factors including aggression, active shooters, sexual assault, theft, crowds, vandalism, underage drinking and driving.

Public Safety Teams IN Nightlife Districts

FORMAT: PANEL

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 10:00 am - 11:15 am

Leading Change Through Coordination and Compliance

Public safety in the nighttime economy requires an inter-agency collaborative among key regulatory and compliance agencies to identify risks and coordinate intervention and education. Learn from cities with Public Safety Teams or similar collaboratives about the challenges and benefits of information sharing to sustain venue compliance and patron responsibility.

DISCUSSION TOPICS:

  • How do you make the case for establishing and sustaining an inter-agency team?
  • How do officer shortages and budget cuts limit response to nighttime risk management?
  • What is the structure of your inter-agency collaborative? What would be the ideal?
  • How is data collected and used for venue education, compliance and enforcement?
  • What special selection and training criteria is important in officers deployed at night?

PANELISTS

marina leight
Vice President for Strategic Relationships
Signify
RHI Board Member
Moderator

CARMEN BEST
Chief of Police
Seattle Police Department

Kathie Durbin
Chief, Licensure
Montgomery County Alcohol Beverage Services
RHI Board Member

elizabeth McDowell
Senior Fire Prevention Officer
Sacramento Fire Department

STIRRING THE POT OF CANNABIS REGULATION: FROM BREWS TO BLUNTS

FORMAT: PANEL

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: March 2, 2020

TIME: 10:45 am - 12:00 pm

Ready or not, here it comes!

Cannabis legalization is taking the country by storm. State-by-state, cannabis has been decriminalized and legalized for recreational use. Washington, Oregon and California are the early adopters of state legalization; Canada is a leader on a federal level. If your city (and state/province) isn’t ready with a plan for regulation and enforcement of the cannabis industry, then your city may be caught unprepared.

Cannabis and alcohol are similar in that they’re a recreational substance of choice for many North Americans. Thus, many government leaders are applying a system of control for alcohol to cannabis. Others are choosing a different path, and both are passing authority to local governments to establish their own controls and/or taxation.

Beyond regulation and safety concerns, cannabis represents a new frontier for economic development, a new tax base and an opportunity to achieve social equity. This panel discussion will explore various facets of cannabis in municipalities.

DISCUSSION TOPICS

  • Pros and cons of different regulatory models
  • Defining the future of standards for on-premise consumption spaces
  • Overcoming stigma after decriminalization of cannabis
  • Technological approaches for measuring intoxication and determining odor violations
  • Tracking cannabis tourism
  • Social equity initiatives to address the harms caused by the war on drugs by removing barriers for entry
  • If you could write the model regulation, what would be the number one policy?

PANELISTS

Paul Seres
Founding Trustee
New York City Hospitality Alliance
RHI Board Co-chair
Moderator

Justin nordhorn
Chief, Enforcement and Education Division
Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board

Will Higlin
Deputy Director
Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC)

Jocelyn Kane
RHI Senior Consultant
Vice President
Coachella Valley Cannabis Alliance Network

Community-Centered Compliance: Shifting from "Doing to" to "Doing with"

FORMAT: PANEL

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 2:45 pm  - 4:00 pm

is your nightlife enforcement like a game of "whack-a-mole"?

Do you address one problem, then it pops up somewhere else again? If this rings true, then your current approach to managing nightlife may not be working. Uncovering the origin of nightlife challenges requires more than a heavy hand. It takes a community.

Some might say that community-building takes too much time and isn't worth the effort. But what's the alternative? Fines and penalties of nuisance businesses and court hearings are also labor and time-intensive. By the time a business gets closed, an owner may open a new business in a new location or under a different operator. Problems snowball without ever being effectively addressed. It's time to face reality: traditional approaches are not working to prevent crime.

Cities throughout the U.S. and Canada are embracing new ways to manage nightlife, where enforcement is the last resort. Learn how Chicago, Seattle, Toronto, Sacramento and Montgomery County, MD use education, trust-building and mediation to resolve the toughest challenges after dark.

Attend this session to find out how to orient advocacy, regulation and policy with the nightlife business community instead of to or for them.

DISCUSSION TOPICS:

  • Tips to identify root causes of nightlife issues
  • How to break the cycle of playing "whack-a-mole" and create systemic solutions
  • Strategies to empower businesses to get involved in policy creation, advocacy and peer mentoring
  • Case studies of how to engage stakeholders at odds— residents, businesses, enforcement and regulation—to problem solve together to coexist
  • Closing the gaps to make prosecution of nuisance businesses more effective—from training field officers on how to better document violations in reports to achieving buy-in from city council
  • Partnerships between safety agencies, residents and the business community for mutual education
  • Promoting business growth while maintaining high standards for public safety
  • Institutionalizing community mediation processes for businesses that have received violations to help them achieve compliance through education and training

 

PANELISTS

MIKI STRICKER-TALBOT
Intrapreneur Strategic Design
Edmonton, AB
MODERATOR

Kathie Durbin
Chief, Licensure
Montgomery County Alcohol Beverage Services
RHI Board

Tina Lee-Vogt
Program Manager Community Development Department
Sacramento, CA

KATE BECKER
Creative Economy Strategist
Office of King County Executive Dow Constantine

Supervisors Share Solutions on Safety and Security

FORMAT: SOLUTION SESSION

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 11:30 am  - 12:45 pm

Whether your city has a dedicated team or uses overtime officers, there is usually a supervisor responsible for coordinating deployment from the early evening to late night hours. Their role is particularly critical in managing closing time activity to prevent vibrancy from becoming chaos. In the best cases, they are progressive leaders who develop proactive strategies and who build trust between police, patrons and the business community.

This session will provide an opportunity for participants to share their approach to nighttime policing and security. Representatives from Seattle and Sacramento will describe the evolution of their approach, accomplishments, challenges and recommendations for other supervisors in charge of active nightlife districts.

DISCUSSION TOPICS:

  • What is unique about policing nightlife districts?
  • How can public safety and venue operators, managers and security staff develop and implement standard practices?
  • Is there an ideal mix of bike, mounted, beat and motorized officer deployment? How does it vary by time of night?
  • What are the pros and cons of overtime detail officers?
  • What is the ideal terminology for nightlife district officers or teams— Hospitality? Tourism?
  • What agencies other than police need to deploy officers in the field at night? How can they collaborate with police for inspections, training and education of venues?

PANELISTS

Christopher Brownlee
 Detective
Seattle Police Department

Kristi morse
Sergeant
Sacramento Police Department

Participant solution stories and strategies

FORMAT: PANEL

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 9:15 am  - 10:30 am

Kansas City, MO Shares an Innovative Approach to Reduce Gun Violence

After the passage of Missouri’s very permissive open carry gun law and a resulting increase in gun-related incidents in the oldest and largest entertainment district, Kansas City leaders moved forward with an unusual decision: privatize some public spaces. City Council voted to give ownership and control of sidewalks in Westport’s core to the Westport Community Improvement District (CID).

This enabled the CID to implement security screenings in the form of metal detectors at all entrances to the pedestrian-only area of the district on Friday and Saturday evenings starting at 11:00 p.m. Since implementation in August 2018, weapons offenses have dropped by 64% in the entire district; there have also been double digit drops in all other violent crimes. Meanwhile, attendance, occupancy and investment have increased.

Even though the Westport Entertainment District has never had any legitimate claims of profiling or discrimination in its more than 150-year existence, civil rights monitors were hired and trained to observe all entry screeners to ensure no one would be unfairly denied entry and to ensure that all patrons continued to feel comfortable coming to the district.

DISCUSSION TOPICS:

  • Finding creative ways to reduce gun violence
  • Ensuring non-discriminatory security procedures
  •  Building partnerships to address a community crime problem

PANELISTS

fRANKLIN kIMBROUGH Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer
Westport Community Improvement District

jeanine crookshank
Programs & Financial Manager
Ad Hoc Group Against Crime

Rick usher
Assistant City Manager
City of Kansas City, Missouri

Security Guard Training to Produce a Safer 21st Century Venue

FORMAT: TECHNICAL WORKSHOP

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: MARCH 1, 2020

TIME: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm

“Guard Card,” “Class D License” and "Guard Certificate” are just some of the state security guard training programs that have been used to provide bar and club guards (bouncers) training for years and years. In many states, these programs are mandated, forcing operators to use them or be in violation of the law.

The hospitality security guard of the 21st century must have skills that match our society and nightlife today and tomorrow, including training and skills that can constantly adapt, move forward and, in some areas, mimic modern-day law enforcement. The person must be able to communicate with multiple races, ages, sexes, and have a complete understanding of what their role is before, during and after any type of violence.

This session will provide attendees with a national perspective on what is being done and what they could do immediately upon their return to their jurisdictions to train the guard of the 21st century.

FACILITATOR

rOBERT SMITH
 CEO/President
Nightclub Security Consultants

#MeToo IN NIGHTLIFE: CREATING A CULTURE OF RESPECT

FORMAT: INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP

BUILDING BLOCK: ASSURE SAFETY

DATE: MARCH 1, 2020

TIME: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm

Sexual harassment and assault have long been problems in Nightlife

Attention to them has intensified with the #MeToo movement and with growing awareness of harassment of nightlife workers.

Bystander intervention skills help create cultures of respect in bars, restaurants, concert venues and other nightlife establishments. Industry workers build on their existing hospitality skills and values to create safe and respectful spaces for patrons and staff alike. Starting from the understanding that alcohol does not cause sexual assault, communities can identify the benefits of prioritizing a respectful culture, and gain the skills and infrastructure to do so.

PRESENTER

Lauren Taylor
Founder & Director
Safe Bars

 

In this interactive workshop, participants will learn:

  • How sexual harassment happens in nightlife
  • How to identify problems in the early phases
  • How to create safe and welcoming environments for staff and customers
  • Cutting-edge bystander intervention skills tailored to the industry that they can take back to their establishments and communities

 

 

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