PLAN FOR PEOPLE: PANELS, SOLUTION SESSIONS AND WORKSHOPS

SMART SOCIAL GROWTH PLANNING for the nightlife culture requires foresight and infrastructure with an expanded focus on how people use a mixed-use hospitality zone at different times of day and for different purposes.

THE CHANGING NATURE OF RETAIL: ACTIVATING STREETS WITH SOCIAL USES

FORMAT: PANEL

BUILDING BLOCK: PLAN FOR PEOPLE

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 11:30 am  - 12:45 pm

Vacant storefronts are the bane of downtowns and Main Street America. Empty businesses are magnets for graffiti and blight, making a street feel dark, scary and unsafe, especially at night. Some retailers have held on by using creative tactics to bring in customers, such as events and live music. Yet many retail stores haven't survived the boom of online shopping. In some cases, food, beverage and entertainment businesses have taken their place.

Yet the rise of the hospitality and nightlife industry raises some difficult questions. What if your downtown loses its business mix and becomes primarily hospitality-driven? What about your daytime vibrancy? Does your city (and current buildings) have the infrastructure to support such high intensity uses or will retrofitting be necessary?

Cities in the 21st century are struggling to achieve balance and social activation during both day at night. While there is no magic wand or perfect solution, there are examples of ideas that are working.

 

PANELISTS

Panelists will explore a variety of trends, challenges and innovative concepts impacting street activation and sociability.

David Downey
President
International Downtown Association
RHI Board Member
MODERATOR

tom moriarity
Principal
Retail Development Strategies, LLC
RHI Board Member

Ben Van Houten
Business Development Manager
Office of Economic and
Workforce Development

San Francisco, California

DISCUSSION TOPICS

  • How can cities protect legacy businesses and support creative business ideas that aren't easily defined?
  • How can city planning and development requirements (e.g. ground-floor retail) be updated to anticipate hospitality infrastructure needs?
  • How will the growing trend of virtual "ghost" kitchens, food trucks and home delivery impact the brick and mortar dining sector?
  • How can placemaking initiatives animate public spaces during both the day and night?

Managing sound in a music city

FORMAT: SOLUTION SESSION

BUILDING BLOCK: PLAN FOR PEOPLE

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 2:45 pm  - 4:00 pm

A resident moves in next to a nightclub. Or, a new nightclub opens next to a residence. What do you think the #1 complaint is going to be? Noise! Believe it or not, even cities renowned for their epic nightlife, including the Live Music Capital of the World, are not immune to this issue.

Hear from the pioneers of “Agent of Change” policy on how to avoid the most common challenges of new hospitality and/or residential development that open near each other. For existing venues, learn some practical tips on how to help your business owners and residents coexist.

Jocelyn Kane brings her experience as executive director, San Francisco Entertainment Commission, and RHI Senior Consultant. Brian Block will share his experience from managing sound in Austin.

SESSION FACILITATORS

Jocelyn Kane
RHI Senior Consultant
Former Executive Director
San Francisco Entertainment Commission

BRIAN BLOCK
Entertainment Manager
Austin, Texas

Participant solution stories and strategies

DISCUSSION TOPICS

  • Resolve conflicts on sound between residents and nightlife venues
  • Updates to sound regulations, including soundproofing, building design, sound level restrictions
  • Methods to distinguish sources of sound
  • Strategies for sound ordinance compliance
  • Create forums for development of sound management improvements inclusive of all stakeholders
  • Centralize a process for conflict resolution and balance of different interests

 

Thinking Outside the Big Red Cup

FORMAT: TECHNICAL WORKSHOP

BUILDING BLOCK: PLAN FOR PEOPLE

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 2:45 pm  - 4:00 pm

Individual and Environmental Approaches to Substance Use in College Communities

College communities with active nightlife face unique challenges. The line can blur between where a college campus ends and downtown begins. Colleges and universities work hard to educate their students about being good neighbors and contributing members of their community. Yet long-term residents often bear the brunt of negative impacts from students who do not model good behavior or act as ideal neighbors.  The combination of a large college student population in a community with a vibrant nighttime economy can result in numerous challenges.

Research suggests that the best approach is a combination of programs to address problematic drinkers at an individual level coupled with prevention strategies that apply to the whole population, creating a synergy that can reduce alcohol-related problems across the board.

Two leading researchers with practical experience in the design and implementation of these approaches will engage participants in a discussion about what research has shown could work, the challenges that can arise in implementation, and what issues have confronted those who have had responsibility for addressing this problem. Session participants will be invited to share their experiences with approaches to managing campus and community relations and risk management

PANELISTS

Beth Bagwell
Executive Director
International Town Gown Association
RHI Board Member
MODERATOR

jason r kilmer
Associate Professor    Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
 University of Washington

robert saltz
Senior Scientist
Prevention Research Center

 

DISCUSSION TOPICS

Challenges identified in RHI’s Sociable City Guide

  • Off-campus Housing: House parties increase risk of underage drinking and neighborhood conflicts.
  • Pre-loading: Also called "pre-gaming" or “pre-drinking,” the practice can result in both patron risk and venue liability.
  • Sexual Assault: : Alcohol is involved in 75% of cases, which is why nightlife settings need to be considered in prevention efforts

MOBILITY TRENDS IN NIGHTLIFE

FORMAT: SOLUTION SESSION

BUILDING BLOCK: PLAN FOR PEOPLE

DATE: March 1, 2020

TIME: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm

With more people living in or near downtowns and city centers, mobility options are moving away from personal automobiles. People are walking more, using electric bicycles and scooters, and prefer rideshare services over taxi and public transit. In recognition of these trend, cities are updating infrastructure with bike lanes, pedestrian crossings and rideshare pick-up and drop-off hubs.

This session will focus on how emerging mobility options are a greater risk at night for people impaired by alcohol, especially pedestrians and cyclists. Attend to hear new perspectives on how nightlife districts can accommodate a variety of transportation systems to provide efficient movement and reduced safety risk.

Session participants will be invited to share a story about their approach to nighttime mobility.

SESSION FACILITATORS

Panelists will set a framework and Session participants will be invited to share a story about their approach to NIGHTTIME MOBILITY.

dominique greco
Project Manager
Downtown Development Board
Orlando, FL

Matthew marcou
Associate Director for Public Space Regulation Division
DC Department of Transportation

DISCUSSION TOPICS

  • Identify trends in regulation of new mobility systems
  • Learn about Orlando’s Transport Hub system for more efficient dispersal of closing time crowds, coordinated access to rides and reduction in traffic congestion
  • Adapt bike lanes for other micro-transit uses
  • Engage app service providers (Uber, Lyft, Lime, etc.) in local planning
  • Discuss future of driverless vehicles and early experiments

 

RESPONSIBLE HOSPITALITY INSTITUTE

831.469.3396

RHI is a nonprofit organization founded in 1983 with a mission to assist
businesses and communities to plan safe and vibrant places to socialize.

©2018 Responsible Hospitality Institute